What is this indicator?  Click for explanation.

Click to view the chart.         

Place Your Order In The Cart
 
.
 All prices are in U.S. Dollars
This Site Is SecureImage of Visa, Mastercard, amd Discover Credit CardsImage of The MasterCard Credit Card 
PayPal

.
Price/Volume Surges

Price/Volume Surges

Price/Volume Surges
Click to enlarge image(s)

     Why monitor price and volume surges?  Consider the following.  When traders believe their indicators suggest a stock is about to break through a line of resistance some will act in anticipation of the event (buying pressure will increase).  Other traders will buy when they notice, even before the breakout, the increase in volume on price increases and diminishing volume on price declines.  When a stock actually breaks to the upside through resistance, other traders will notice and buy, causing the price and volume to surge.  These conditions often precede the beginning of a significant price move.  It is only logical that if a company has just developed an exciting  new cure, product, or service, people will hear about it and act accordingly.  The price of its stock will surge and its trading volume will increase (the stock price will pick up momentum).  High-powered professional traders have systems that flash an "alert" or "signal" when a stock has an unusual price and volume surge.  When they note it, they will buy and the price/volume surge will be magnified.  Whenever a stock starts a new trend, it draws attention.  

Investors like to buy at the beginning of a trend.  Therefore, when the price spikes up and the volume surges, momentum for the new trend builds.  When a stock has been declining and the last holdouts give up, their selling will cause the stock to decline even more as the volume surges.  Traders will notice the stock's behavior and buy the "bargain."  Volume will increase even more as the price reverses direction.  In this scenario, the stock has just had a selling climax and a price reversal.  More traders will then notice that there has been a "selling climax" (it can be seen in the chart of a stock) and begin to accumulate.  Others add the stock to their "watch list" so they can buy as soon as the new trend takes on more definition.  Often, the surges highlighted on an alert list will not be particularly attractive to a trader because the stock's pattern will be compromised by nearby overhead resistance.  However, the alerts sometimes present an opportunity to get in at the beginning of a nice move.  A stock's closing price relative to the day's price action and overall price pattern, and its volume at the close (and the percentage change in volume for the day) are important when the stock has had a price surge, gap or spike.  These lists are presented so that you can evaluate the situation for yourself

     The lists of surging stocks provided here focus on 1-day surges and are found by scanning a database of more than 8,000 stocks.  These stocks have all experienced some unusual action.  A daily review of the charts of stocks listed here can enable you to observe setup configurations evolving, and maybe also enable you to uncover stocks that have recently started out on new trends, stocks breaking out of a consolidation pattern, or stocks that have had unusual market activity for some other reason.  We suggest reviewing the charts of these stocks to see if they are of sufficient interest to warrant purchase or inclusion on your "watch list."  One reason for including a stock on your watch list is so you can monitor it while waiting for a good entry point.  For example, you might wait for a pullback to a rising trendline.  You might also wait for some sign that the trendline is holding or that the stock is responding to it in a positive way.  Waiting for such a pullback can also help you optimize your stop-loss placement.  The buy price is then only slightly above support.  When the stop loss is placed a little below the expected support (the trendline), any decline that triggers the stop will be a meaningful decline because support could not stop the decline, but the decline that triggers the sell order will also be relatively small (and so will any consequential loss if the unexpected happens).

The columns show the closing price, % change in price, 1-day percentage change in volume (Vol %) respectively, and the 10-day momentum (Mom).

Before ordering, see our policies regarding automatic renewals, cancellations, and refunds

Also, before ordering, read this important message.